What’s DASS?

Sep 8, 2021Psychology

8

September 2021

Written by: Karen Ellis

Last month’s article discussed the difference between emotions and mood, outlining how Budee uses a mood questionnaire to track and identify potential “problematic mood states that are extreme, persistent, or rapidly fluctuating” (Litvack, 2021). Let’s delve a little more into what this questionnaire entails, its usefulness, and, especially, its relevance to mental wellness.

Budee uses a self-analysis questionnaire called the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) which is designed to measure the negative emotional states of depression, anxiety, and stress/tension (Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995). Users of Budee’s application are asked, each morning, to rate the severity and/or frequency to which they have experienced each state over the past week. Scores for depression, anxiety and stress are then calculated. Why is this important and why does Budee use DASS?

Daily self-analysis is important because, although the mood scales do not categorize a mood disorder, they compare “normal” responses to those that vary from the norm. It has been found that the differences between the two groups are differences of degree. In other words, responses can be similar between the two groups but it is a question of the amount of difference, i.e., the severity and frequency of the differences.

By using Budee we are hoping that workers will be more attuned, not only to their physical state, but to their mental state as well.

Why does Budee use DASS? Firstly, the efficacy of DASS has been confirmed by the research data.

Secondly, if a company chooses to toggle on the “mood” criteria, both the supervisor and the employee will see the daily check-in, however, it only highlights “green”, “yellow”, or “red”. No confidential information nor DASS results are sent to management at any time. Follow-up is reserved, solely, for the user in order to respect privacy. A supervisor may, however, choose to contact an employee, through the Budee application, who has flagged red or yellow alerts to check-in with them before they begin their workday.

Thirdly, and most importantly, the essential function of the DASS is to assess the severity of the core symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress (Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995). The scores alert the worker to a possible concern for his/her mental health. Employees decide, unilaterally, whether or not they will discuss any concerns with their supervisor or seek consultation with an outside source. By using Budee we are hoping that workers will be more attuned, not only to their physical state, but to their mental state as well.

Next time we will talk about why assessing one’s mental health is important as well as how it affects job performance and an employer’s bottom line.

Litvack, W. (2021, July 29). Mood assessment. Budee Solutions.

Lovibond, S.H. & Lovibond, P.F. (1995). Manual for the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales. (2nd. Ed.) Sydney: Psychology Foundation.

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